GeekTube

With all the nonsense that fills the internet, it's a good idea for smart people to carve out their own little piece of bandwidth, under the premise of "use it or lose it".

Thus I give you the LHC Webcast, free of stupid worries about the Earth being sucked into a black hole, or other nonsense... just pure and awesome (literally) science.

Of course, things are run on Europe-time, which means that the stream starts in a few minutes, with the "keynote" seven trillion eV event (10^9 keV!!!) scheduled for 3am EST, if I did my math right.

(All times below CEST, Central European Summer Time):
8:30 Webcast begins with live coverage of the LHC accelerator team's daily meeting in the CERN Control Centre
9:00 Webcast continues with the first attempt to collide protons at 7 TeV (3.5 TeV per beam). Live satellite coverage begins via EBU. From 9:00 to 11:00, coverage will include: live footage from the control rooms of the LHC accelerator and experiments; step-by-step explanations of how the LHC teams bring beams into collision, with commentary from the team operating the LHC accelerator; and interviews with leaders of CERN and the LHC experiments.
11:00 Webcast continues; live satellite coverage ends. From 11:00-15:30, coverage will include: live footage from the control rooms of the LHC accelerator and experiments; updates on progress of beams and collisions; interviews with experts on the physics of the LHC at 7 TeV.
12:00 Update from the CERN Control Centre
12:10 Live from the ATLAS Experiment
12:20 Live from the ALICE Experiment
12:30 Roundtable: Dark matter, supersymmetry, black holes and antimatter
12:40 Live from the CMS Experiment
12:50 Live from the LHCb Experiment
13:00 Update from the CERN Control Centre
13:10 Live from the ATLAS Experiment
13:20 Live from the ALICE Experiment
13:30 Roundtable: The Higgs boson
13:40 Live from the CMS Experiment
13:50 Live from the LHCb Experiment
14:00 Update from the CERN Control Centre
14:10 Live from the ATLAS Experiment
14:20 Live from the ALICE Experiment
14:30 Roundtable: Societal benefits of particle physics
14:40 Live from the CMS Experiment
14:50 Live from the LHCb Experiment
15:00 Update from the CERN Control Centre
15:10 Live from the ATLAS Experiment
15:20 Live from the ALICE Experiment
15:30 Live from the CMS Experiment
15:40 Live from the LHCb Experiment
15:50 Replay of live satellite coverage (first transmitted 9:00-11:00)
17:50 Farewell from CERN
18:00 Highlights from the day's event
18:15 Webcast ends

(a) Hey, the best science happens in the middle of the night.
(b) It's five o'clock somewhere!

  

Baking Overachievements

Given that it's that holiday season where one has a built-in excuse to randomly bake all sorts of yummy goodies, I suggest the blog people to point their 'tubes over to the Stamford Museum & Nature Center’s first annual Visions of Gingerbread: The Sweetest Architects holiday exhibition. Some impressive stuff, especially the gingerbread rollercoaster:

Impressive

  

Magical Mice!

I had to go to the Apple store yesterday to get another power supply for my laptop. I have three places where I use the computer (office, home, and apartment) and I kept forgetting my existing one one place or another. Anyway, if you have lots of them you don't have to carry them around.

While I was there though, I picked up one of Apple's new Magic Mice. I have to say that it's definitely the best bluetooth mouse I've ever used. The laser tracking is really nice, it has decent heft, and fits in your hand well. The cool thing though is that the surface of the mouse works as a multi-touch trackpad so you can scroll around by sliding your finger on the surface of the mouse. It works really nicely. Right and left click work too with the mouse sensing which finger you're using to click.

Now for the negatives.
1) I didn't actually need a new mouse, but couldn't help myself.
2) There isn't a middle mouse button, which would be handy for pasting in UNIX programs. I assume this could be fixed in software though.
3) I actually prefer a corded mouse. (The batteries in the Magic Mouse are supposed to last around 4 months, so this might just not be an issue.)

So, in conclusion, both of Apple's mice right now are pretty good and I really like the "Mighty Mouse" (now just the "Apple Mouse"), but the ball on my old mice seem to get jammed up every 6 months or so sending the mice to mouse heaven. The fact that the new mouse doesn't have any moving parts should hopefully solve that problem.