Kick Spindle

Later this month I’m teaching a two week introduction to spinning course. Here is one of the spinning tools I’ve built recently, a kick spindle.

As a starting point for my design I read this post by Layne Brosius, a.k.a. AFrayedKnotter. My kick spindle is pretty similar to hers. There are two major differences. The first is that I used a 1″ thick piece of poplar with feet, as you can see in the pictures. The weight of the flywheel (a furniture bun foot from Lowe’s) seems to give the device sufficient inertia both to spin for a while and to not slide across the floor during use.  I’ve only used the kick spindle on carpeting and outdoor cement, but I think if I put some rubber feet on the bottom it would stay in place on wood or tile, too.

The second significant change I made is in the bearing design. Most kick spindles I’ve seen use roller bearings, like you’d find in a roller skate. That would make the spindle turn longer between kicks, but nice bearings are expensive (especially if I’m looking to build ten of these in a class), and I don’t really mind kicking in a rhythm, since I’m used to treadling on a wheel anyway. Instead of a $4 skate bearing, I came up with something that costs a dime, namely an actual dime:

I drilled into the base at a 45° angle with a ¾” spade bit then super glued a dime onto the floor of the angled hole. I put a divot in the dime with a 1/16″ metal bit.

In the divot rests the sharpened metal point of the spindle. To point the spindle end, I nailed a small finishing nail into the center of the 1/2″ dowel that I used for the spindle (I used 1/2″ dowel because I have a 1/2″ in drill bit but not a 3/8″ one. If I had the 3/8″ bit, I’d probably go with the 3/8″ dowel).  Next I sharpened the end of the spindle by cutting away excess wood with a knife. This leaves the small nail head sticking out the end like a pencil lead. I sharpened the head with a file:

The photo doesn’t really do justice to the sharpness of the tip. (but yes, that is a dvd of Flash Dance behind my hand. I’m a spinning maniac, maniac, and I’m spinning like I’ve never done before…) The spindle will go through twelve to twenty rotations per kick:

I spun a few ounces of wool from rolags in a hotel room while watching Elf over thanksgiving weekend.  The kick spindle works pretty well.It fits in car much more easily than a spinning wheel–with a convertible car seat in the back of my Corolla, there’s no way my Saxony wheel would fit anywhere in the car anymore. It’s fairly lightweight, but heavy enough to stay in place. It isn’t as portable as a drop spindle, but the winding on procedure is a bit more efficient. Also I’m still not very good at long draws on a drop spindle, but it’s easy to spin short or long draw on the kick spindle. The kick spindle can  accommodate a very large cop of yarn, So I can spin more yarn before winding balls for plying. Winding directly off the kick spindle is also very easy.  Total cost for the whole thing was about $12. If you wanted something a bit more aesthetic, you could use a plaque with a routed edge for the base and stain the whole thing.

  

The View from my Window

We had zero yard in Dover. So, it was difficult to attract many birds near enough for observation. I did put up one of those suction-cup-mounted window feeders.  A purple finch stopped by for a snack pretty rapidly. However, our cats took to jumping at the window whenever he landed. So Mr. purple finch never stayed at the feeder for long. A wind storm knocked that feeder down, and an eccentric (most people would say crazy) man who kept the streets clean took it away before I could get it the next morning. It was nice of the eccentric man to clean our streets, anyway.

I was pretty excited to have a yard so the cats and I could watch birds from far enough away to not scare them off. I figured it would take a couple days for some avian visitors to find my new feeder.  So, I was pleasantly surprised when half a dozen goldfinches swooped in not ten minutes after I’d hung the feeder.

I like how one is hanging out sideways here:

This female landing on the cord is pretty cool too:

Narration by Beth (she didn’t know I was recording a movie ^_^).

  

Baby Seagull

Have you ever seen a baby seagull? I never had, but my family was visiting last week, and we saw this one on the roof of a building in Portland, ME:

They have polka dotted heads. I think the mother was clever in choosing a roof whose gravel pattern was similar to the coloration of the chick. I got some stills too: